Pregnancy: All Information about Group B Streptococcus

Pregnancy

Highlight – Recommended by the Ministry of Health, testing should be performed during the 34th and 37th weeks of pregnancy

Papanicolau, hemogram, ultrasound, echocardiogram. As the belly grows and months pass, the pregnant woman needs to be attentive to the required exams. One of them is the study of group B streptococcal bacteria performed by obstetricians between the 34th and 37th weeks, shortly before the mother gave birth.

How is the test done? 

The analysis is quick and simple: it consists of removing, with the help of a cotton swab, culture samples of bacteria from the vaginal and anal region. Subsequently, the specialist will check if the bacteria group B streptococci inhabit the intimate region of the mother. The result of the exam is in a few days. The recommendation is to perform the test during the final weeks of gestation, precisely because the closer to giving birth, the more the vaginal flora will remain similar to that of the time of delivery.

Difference between countries

while the Ministry of Health recommends that gynecologists and obstetricians endorse the practice of screening for all pregnant women in United States, the United Kingdom, for example, the story is different. Since last year, the health service there prevents the testing of group B streptococcal bacteria in all pregnant women. “In England, the practice is not to take the exam with everyone, but rather with the risk groups, which are women with a broken handbag more than 18 hours ago and those who are more likely to have preterm deliveries, “explains the gynecologist and obstetrician for humanized labor Alberto Guimarães, leader of the Parto Sem Medo Program. According to the specialist explains, after the rupture of the pouch, the bacteria can rise to the cervix, which increases the chance of infection.

The result was positive? 

According to Guimarães, between 15% and 20% of pregnant women present colonization of the group B streptococcus bacteria. If you are within this statistic, be calm. While the baby is in the womb, there is no chance of infection – the risk only comes at the time of delivery, at which time the bacteria can pass into the newborn. Therefore, if the result was positive, the pregnant woman will be treated with antibiotics in the vein during labor, which greatly reduces the risk of transmission. Still according to the specialist, the bacterial contamination rate for babies with the use of prophylaxis is 0.3 to 0.4 cases per thousand live births.

Transmission

Although the rate of transmission is very low for the baby, it is important to prevent and perform the test, since the transmission leaves the newborn capable of developing meningitis and severe cases of generalized infection, which can lead to death.

Type of delivery

Stay alert: the positive test result for group B streptococci does not exclude the option of normal delivery. ”You can not indicate a cesarean section because the woman has the result for the positive group B streptococcus , this result only serves to screen people who need antibiotics during labor. In addition, one of the advantages of normal birth is that the passage of the baby through the vaginal canal causes it to contact the bacteria in the mother’s body and develop defenses. Most of the time, he already has the antibodies because the mother passed him.

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About the Author

Dr. Ozus
Hey guys, Welcome to our newly launched Health Website . This website is the result of years of extensive research on various health and nutrition related issues . The topics covered are significant in terms of everyday wellness quotient .Our Expert bloggers would always be there in ensuring you of healthy life.

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